Matthew 9:36

Matthew 9:36
(KJV)
But when he saw the multitudes, he was moved with compassion on them, because they fainted, and were scattered abroad, as sheep having no shepherd.
(1611 KJV) But when he saw the multitudes, he was moued with compassion on them, because they fainted, and were scattered abroad, as sheepe hauing no shepheard.
(1568 Bishops Bible) But when he sawe the multitudes, he was moued with compassion on them, because they were destitute, and scattered abrode, euen as sheepe, hauing no shephearde.
(1526 Tyndale) But when he sawe the people he had copassion on the because they were pyned awaye and scattered abroade eve as shepe havige no shepherd.

Counterfeit Versions
(1881 RV) But when he saw the multitudes, he was moved with compassion for them, because they were distressed and scattered, as sheep not having a shepherd.
(1901 ASV) But when he saw the multitudes, he was moved with compassion for them, because they were distressed and scattered, as sheep not having a shepherd.
(AMP) When He saw the throngs, He was moved with pity and sympathy for them, because they were bewildered (harassed and distressed and dejected and helpless), like sheep without a shepherd.
(CEB) Now when Jesus saw the crowds, he had compassion for them because they were troubled and helpless, like sheep without a shepherd.
(CEV) When he saw the crowds, he felt sorry for them. They were confused and helpless, like sheep without a shepherd.
(1899 Douay-Rheims American Edition) And seeing the multitudes, he had compassion on them: because they were distressed, and lying like sheep that have no shepherd.
(ERV) Jesus saw the many people and felt sorry for them because they were worried and helpless—like sheep without a shepherd to lead them.
(ESV) When he saw the crowds, he had compassion for them, because they were harassed and helpless, like sheep without a shepherd.
(GNB) As he saw the crowds, his heart was filled with pity for them, because they were worried and helpless, like sheep without a shepherd.
(JB Phillips) As he looked at the vast crowds he was deeply moved with pity for them, for they were as bewildered and miserable as a flock of sheep with no shepherd.
(THE MESSAGE) When he looked out over the crowds, his heart broke. So confused and aimless they were, like sheep with no shepherd.
(NASV) Seeing the people, He felt compassion for them, because they were distressed and dispirited like sheep without a shepherd.
(NCV) When he saw the crowds, he felt sorry for them because they were hurting and helpless, like sheep without a shepherd.
(NIRV) When he saw the crowds, he felt deep concern for them. They were beaten down and helpless, like sheep without a shepherd.
(2011 NIV) When he saw the crowds, he had compassion on them, because they were harassed and helpless, like sheep without a shepherd.
(NLV) As He saw many people, He had loving-pity on them. They were troubled and were walking around everywhere. They were like sheep without a shepherd.
(NLT) When he saw the crowds, he had compassion on them because they were confused and helpless, like sheep without a shepherd.
(RSV) When he saw the crowds, he had compassion for them, because they were harassed and helpless, like sheep without a shepherd.
(2010 NAB-Roman Catholic) At the sight of the crowds, his heart was moved with pity for them because they were troubled and abandoned, like sheep without a shepherd.
(NWT-Jehovah’s Witnesses) On seeing the crowds he felt pity for them, because they were skinned and thrown about like sheep without a shepherd.

Textus Receptus - Traditional Text
ιδων δε τους οχλους εσπλαγχνισθη περι αυτων οτι ησαν εκλελυμενοι και ερριμμενοι ωσει προβατα μη εχοντα ποιμενα

Hort-Westcott - Critical Text
ιδων δε τους οχλους εσπλαγχνισθη περι αυτων οτι ησαν εσκυλμενοι και ερριμμενοι ωσει προβατα μη εχοντα ποιμενα

Corrupted Manuscripts
This verse is corrupted in the following manuscripts:
Byzantine Text (450-1450 A.D.)
Aleph 01 - Sinaiticus - Fourth century
B 03 - Vaticanus - Fourth century
C 04 - Ephraemi Rescriptus - Fifth century
D 05 - Bezae Cantabrigiensis - Fifth century
K 017 - Ninth century
Gamma 036 - Ninth or Tenth century
Delta 037 - Ninth century
Theta 038 - Ninth century

Manuscripts which agree with the Textus Receptus for this verse
Stephanus (1550 A.D.)
Elzivir (1624)
L 019 - Seventh century

Published Critical Greek Texts with Corruptions
Reads “were harassed” instead of “fainted”
Greisbach, Johann - 1805
Lachmann, Karl - 1842
Tischendorf, Constantine - 1869
Tregelles, Samuel - 1857
Alford, Henry - 1849 revised in 1871
Wordsworth, Christopher - 1856 revised in 1870
Westcott and Hort - 1881
Weiss, Bernhard - 1894
Nestle - 1927 as revised in seventeenth edition in 1941
Nestle-Aland - 1979 - Twenty Sixth Edition
Nestle-Aland - 1993 - Twenty Seventh Edition
United Bible Societies - 1983 - Fourth Edition
Von Soden, Freiherr - 1902
Hodges and Farstad - Majority Text 1982 as corrected in 1985

Affected Teaching
The word “faint” in the Greek in the King James Bible means “to weaken, languid, exhausted.” The main context is that the crowds who were following Jesus had followed Him for so long that they began to become tired and weary. If you notice the words the modern versions exchange it for: distressed, harassed, skinned, troubled, confused, beaten down, bewildered, miserable, worried, aimless, and hurting. Not one of these words would be a proper replacement for the word “faint.” We have all been tired and weary, but does that mean we are aimless, confused, distressed, etc.? Let’s approach it from another angle. If we were weakened, a good rest along with some good food would revive us. Would good rest and food stop confusion or being harassed? The answer is no. The crowd was suffering from fatigue from following Jesus and were not being skinned or harassed or bewildered.

 

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