Luke 7:10
 
Luke 7:10
(KJV) And they that were sent, returning to the house, found the servant whole that had been sick.
(1611 KJV) And they that were sent, returning to the house, found the seruant whole that had bene sicke.
(1587 Geneva Bible) And when they that were sent, turned backe to the house, they founde the seruant that was sicke, whole.
(1526 Tyndale) And they yt were sent turned backe home agayne and founde the servaunt that was sicke whoole.
 
Counterfeit Versions
(NIV) Then the men who had been sent returned to the house and found the servant well.
(NASV) When those who had been sent returned to the house, they found the slave in good health.
(THE MESSAGE) .When the messengers got back home, they found the servant up and well.
(AMP) And when the messengers who had been sent returned to the house, they found the bond servant who had been ill quite well again.
(NLT) And when the officer’s friends returned to his house, they found the slave completely healed.
(ESV) And when those who had been sent returned to the house, they found the servant well.
(CEV) The officer's friends returned and found the servant well.
(NCV) Those who had been sent to Jesus went back to the house where they found the servant in good health.
(1901 ASV) And they that were sent, returning to the house, found the servant whole.
(HCSB) When those who had been sent returned to the house, they found the slave in good health.
(RSV) And when those who had been sent returned to the house, they found the slave well.
(NAB-Roman Catholic) When the messengers returned to the house, they found the slave in good health.
(NWT-Jehovah’s Witnesses) And those that had been sent, on getting back to the house, found the slave in good health.
 
Textus Receptus - Traditional Text
kai upostreyanteV oi pemjqenteV eiV ton oikon euron ton asqenounta doulon ugiainonta
 
Hort-Westcott - Critical Text
kai upostreyanteV eiV ton oikon oi pemjqenteV euron ton doulon ugiainonta
 
Corrupted Manuscripts
This verse is corrupted in the following manuscripts:
Aleph 01 - Sinaiticus - Nineteenth Century Counterfeit
B 03 - Vaticanus - Fourth century
L 019 - Seventh century
W 032 - Fourth/fifth century
P 75 - Third century
1 (miniscule) - Seventh century
700 - (Miniscule) Eleventh century
 
Manuscripts which agree with the Textus Receptus for this verse
Byzantine Text (450-1450 A.D.)
A 02 - Alexandrinus - Fifth century
C 04 - Ephraemi Rescriptus - Fifth century
K 017 - Ninth century
R 027 - Sixth century
Gamma 036 - Ninth or Tenth century
Delta 037 - Ninth century
Theta 038 - Ninth century
13 (Minuscule) - Eighth century
28 (Minuscule) - Eleventh century
 
Published Critical Greek Texts with Corruptions
Omit “that had been sick”
Lachmann, Karl - 1842
Tischendorf, Constantine - 1869
Tregelles, Samuel - 1857
Alford, Henry - 1849 revised in 1871 (in brackets or margin)
Westcott and Hort - 1881
Nestle - 1927 as revised in seventeenth edition in 1941
Nestle-Aland - 1979 - Twenty Sixth Edition
Nestle-Aland - 1993 - Twenty Seventh Edition
United Bible Societies - 1983 - Fourth Edition
 
Affected Teaching
Here is the story of the centurion who sent people to the Lord Jesus Christ to heal his servant. He did not feel worthy for the Lord Jesus to come under his roof but he had such faith that he believed that all Jesus had to do was to say the word, no matter what distance He was from the Centurion’s home and his servant would be healed. Jesus saw this as great faith and because of that faith, Jesus had healed his servant from a distance. In verse 10 we read a very important part to the narrative which is found in the last phrase, “that had been sick.” The modern versions omit this phrase and therefore reduce the visible effect of both the miracle of healing Jesus did and the faith that the centurion had in Christ. The whole essence of this narrative is the faith of the Centurion and the deity of Christ showing through with the ability to heal at a distance. The modern versions leave out the fact that the servant was previously sick and it just makes the verse look like he was well when visitors came to him. The whole idea was that Christ had healed him and those who saw him, saw that he was well and they knew that he was previously ill. Once again the modern versions rob the Lord Jesus Christ of glory for his divine healing of the Centurion’s servant.

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