Jude 1
 
Jude 1
(KJV) Jude, the servant of Jesus Christ, and brother of James, to them that are sanctified by God the Father, and preserved in Jesus Christ, and called:
(1611 KJV) Iude the seruant of Iesus Christ, and brother of Iames, to them that are sanctified by God the Father, and preserued in Iesus Christ, & called:
(1587 Geneva Bible) Ivde a seruaunt of Iesus Christ, and brother of Iames, to them which are called and sanctified of God the Father, and returned to Iesus Christ:
(1526 Tyndale) Iudas the servaunt of Iesus Christ the brother of Iames. To them which are cal and sanctified in god the father and preserved in Iesu Christ.
 
Counterfeit Versions
(NIV) Jude, a servant of Jesus Christ and a brother of James, To those who have been called, who are loved by God the Father and kept by Jesus Christ:
(NASV) Jude, a bond-servant of Jesus Christ, and brother of James, To those who are the called, beloved in God the Father, and kept for Jesus Christ:
(NLT) This letter is from Jude, a slave of Jesus Christ and a brother of James. I am writing to all who are called to live in the love of God the Father and the care of Jesus Christ.
(ESV) Jude, a servant of Jesus Christ and brother of James, To those who are called, beloved in God the Father and kept for Jesus Christ:
(1901 ASV) Jude, a servant of Jesus Christ, and brother of James, to them that are called, beloved in God the Father, and kept for Jesus Christ:
(HCSB) Jude, a slave of Jesus Christ, and a brother of James: To those who are the called, loved by God the Father and kept by Jesus Christ.
(NRSV) Jude, a servant of Jesus Christ and brother of James, To those who are called, who are beloved in God the Father and kept safe for Jesus Christ:
(NAB-Roman Catholic) Jude, a slave of Jesus Christ and brother of James, 2 to those who are called, beloved in God the Father and kept safe for Jesus Christ:
(NWT) Jude, a slave of Jesus Christ, but a brother of James, to the called ones who are loved in relationship with God [the] Father and preserved for Jesus Christ:
 
Textus Receptus - Traditional Text
ioudaV ihsou cristou douloV adeljoV de iakwbou toiV en qew patri hgiasmenoiV kai ihsou cristw tethrhmenoiV klhtoiV
 
Hort Westcott - Critical Text
ioudaV ihsou cristou douloV adeljoV de iakwbou toiV en qew patri hgaphmenoiV kai ihsou cristw tethrhmenoiV klhtoiV
 
Corrupted Manuscripts
This verse is corrupted in the following manuscripts:
Aleph 01 - Sinaiticus - Nineteenth Century Counterfeit
A 02 - Alexandrinus - Fifth century
B 03 - Vaticanus - Fourth century
P 72 - Third/fourth century
 
Manuscripts which agree with the Textus Receptus for this verse
Byzantine Text (450-1450 A.D.)
K 018 - Ninth century
L 020 - Ninth century
P 025 - Ninth century
 
Published Critical Greek Texts with Corruptions
Read “beloved” instead of “sanctified”
Lachmann, Karl - 1842
Tischendorf, Constantine - 1869
Tregelles, Samuel - 1857
Alford, Henry - 1849 revised in 1871
Wordsworth, Christopher - 1856 revised in 1870
Westcott and Hort - 1881
Weiss, Bernhard - 1894
Nestle - 1927 as revised in seventeenth edition in 1941
Nestle-Aland - 1979 - Twenty Sixth Edition
Nestle-Aland - 1993 - Twenty Seventh Edition
United Bible Societies - 1983 - Fourth Edition
Von Soden, Freiherr - 1902
 
Affected Teaching
This word switch is probably one of the most subtle switches in the Bible. The King James word uses the root “Hagios,” which means to “sanctified, holy, or set apart.” The Gnostics changed this word to the root word “agapao” which means “love.” Agapao is a term used in the New Testament which teaches that God cares for His people and the world. This word change is an attack on the doctrine of sanctification. When a person becomes saved, they are instantly set apart or sanctified as one of God’s children. The word “hagios” describes that action. When the word “agapao” is substituted, it completely changes the meaning of this passage. The passage teaches that we are sanctified and preserved. It does not say we are loved and preserved. Now it is true that the love of God is qualified and that He loves His own. (John 13:1 KJV) Now before the feast of the passover, when Jesus knew that his hour was come that he should depart out of this world unto the Father, having loved his own which were in the world, he loved them unto the end. We read in the John 13:1 passage that Jesus loved His own in the world and does not say that He loved everyone in the world. The word “loved” is the Greek word “agapao.” While the love of God and the action of sanctification by God are linked, they are two different entities which are both enjoyed by the Elect of God. To substitute love for sanctification does a disservice to this verse and eliminates the doctrine of sanctification from it. The sanctification of the believer is a major biblical doctrine and this attack on it shows that these modern versions do have an effect on doctrinal teaching, even though their supporters claim otherwise.

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