Acts 27:14

(KJV) But not long after there arose against it a tempestuous wind, called Euroclydon.
(1611 KJV) But not long after, there arose against it a tempestuous winde, called Euroclydon.
(1587 Geneva Bible) But anon after, there arose by it a stormy winde called Euroclydon.
(1526 Tyndale) But anone after ther arose agaynste their purpose a flawe of wynde out of the northeeste.

Counterfeit Versions
(1881 RV) But after no long time there beat down from it a tempestuous wind, which is called Euraquilo:
(1901 ASV) But after no long time there beat down from it a tempestuous wind, which is called Euraquilo:
(AMP) But soon afterward a violent wind [of the character of a typhoon], called a northeaster, came bursting down from the island.
(CEB) Before long, a hurricane-strength wind known as a northeaster swept down from Crete.
(CEV) But soon a strong wind called “The Northeaster” blew against us from the island.
(ERV) But then a very strong wind called the “Northeaster” came from across the island.
(ESV) But soon a tempestuous wind, called the northeaster, struck down from the land.
(GNB) But soon a very strong wind—the one called “Northeaster”—blew down from the island.
(HCSB) But not long afterward, a fierce wind called the “northeaster” rushed down from the island.
(JB PHILLIPS) But before long a terrific gale, which they called a north-easter, swept down upon us from the land.
(LB) But shortly afterwards the weather changed abruptly, and a heavy wind of typhoon strength (a “northeaster,” they called it) caught the ship and blew it out to sea.
(THE MESSAGE) But they were no sooner out to sea than a gale-force wind, the infamous nor’easter, struck.
(New American Bible-Revised Edition-Roman Catholic) Before long an offshore wind of hurricane force called a “Northeaster” struck.
(NASV) But before very long there rushed down from the land a violent wind, called Euraquilo;
(NCV) But then a very strong wind named the “northeaster” came from the island.
(NET) Not long after this, a hurricane-force wind called the northeaster blew down from the island.
(NIRV) Before very long, a wind blew down from the island. It had the force of a hurricane. It was called a “northeaster.”
(NIV) Before very long, a wind of hurricane force, called the Northeaster, swept down from the island.
(NKJV) But not long after, a tempestuous head wind arose, called Euroclydon.
(NLV) Later a bad wind storm came down from the land. It was called a northeaster.
(NLT) But the weather changed abruptly, and a wind of typhoon strength (called a “northeaster”) burst across the island and blew us out to sea.
(RSV) But soon a tempestuous wind, called the northeaster, struck down from the land;
(VOICE) Then things got scary. A violent northeaster, the Euraquilo, blew down across Crete.
(NWT-Jehovah’s Witnesses) After a short time, however, a violent wind called Eu·ro·aq′ui·lo rushed down on it.

Textus Receptus - Traditional Text
μετ ου πολυ δε εβαλεν κατ αυτης ανεμος τυφωνικος ο καλουμενος ευροκλυδων

Hort-Westcott - Critical Text
μετ ου πολυ δε εβαλεν κατ αυτης ανεμος τυφωνικος ο καλουμενος ευρακυλων

Corrupted Manuscripts
None

Affected Teaching
The modern versions omit the words “kat autes” which is translated “against it.” There is no reason for those words to be omitted. This is just another case of the modern versions omitting English words without any reason given. A very dangerous practice of the modern versions.

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