Acts 26:30
 
Acts 26:30
(KJV) And when he had thus spoken, the king rose up, and the governor, and Bernice, and they that sat with them:
(1611 KJV) And when hee had thus spoken, the king rose vp, and the gouernour, and Bernice, & they that sate with them.
(1587 Geneva Bible) And when he had thus spoken, the King rose vp, and the gouernour, and Bernice, and they that sate with them.
(1526 Tyndale) And when he had thus spoken the kynge rose vp and the debite and Bernice and they that sate with them.
 
Counterfeit Versions
(1881 RV) And the king rose up, and the governor, and Bernice, and they that sat with them:
(1901 ASV) And the king rose up, and the governor, and Bernice, and they that sat with them:
(NIV) The king rose, and with him the governor and Bernice and those sitting with them.
(NASV) The king stood up and the governor and Bernice, and those who were sitting with them,
(THE MESSAGE) The king and the governor, along with Bernice and their advisors, got up and went into the next room to talk over what they had heard.
(AMP) Then the king arose, and the governor and Bernice and all those who were seated with them;
(NLT) Then the king, the governor, Bernice, and all the others stood and left.
(ESV) Then the king rose, and the governor and Bernice and those who were sitting with them.
(CEV) Then King Agrippa, Governor Festus, Bernice, and everyone who was with them got up.
(NCV) Then King Agrippa, Governor Festus, Bernice, and all the people sitting with them stood up
(HCSB) So the king, the governor, Bernice, and those sitting with them got up,
(RSV) Then the king rose, and the governor and Berni'ce and those who were sitting with them;
(NAB-Roman Catholic) Then the king rose, and with him the governor and Bernice and the others who sat with them.
(NWT-Jehovah’s Witnesses) And the king rose and so did the governor and Ber·ni´ce and the men seated with them.
 
Textus Receptus -Traditional Text
και ταυτα ειποντος αυτου ανεστη ο βασιλευς και ο ηγεμων η τε βερνικη και οι συγκαθημενοι αυτοις
 
Hort-Westcott - Critical Text
ανεστη τε ο βασιλευς και ο ηγεμων η τε βερνικη και οι συγκαθημενοι αυτοις
 
Corrupted Manuscripts
This verse is corrupted in the following manuscripts
Aleph 01 - Sinaiticus - Nineteenth Century Counterfeit
A 02 - Alexandrinus - Fifth century
B 03 - Vaticanus - Fourth century
 
Manuscripts which agree with the Textus Receptus for this verse
Byzantine Text (450-1450 A.D.)
L 020 - Ninth century
P 025 - Ninth century
 
Published Critical Greek Texts with Corruptions
Omit “and when he had thus spoken”
Greisbach, Johann - 1805
Lachmann, Karl - 1842
Tischendorf, Constantine - 1869
Tregelles, Samuel - 1857
Alford, Henry - 1849 revised in 1871
Wordsworth, Christopher - 1856 revised in 1870
Westcott and Hort - 1881
Nestle - 1927 as revised in seventeenth edition in 1941
Nestle-Aland - 1979 - Twenty Sixth Edition
Nestle-Aland - 1993 - Twenty Seventh Edition
United Bible Societies - 1983 - Fourth Edition
 
Affected Teaching
The Apostle Paul had just witnessed to all those who were in attendance in the court of King Agrippa. In verse 29, Paul had stated that his desire was that all those in attendance would become saved but not to have chains placed upon them. Once Paul went into the part about them all becoming Christians, that is when King Agrippa, Festus, and Bernice rose up. It was probably those words about becoming a Christian that caused them to rise up abruptly. The words for “rose up” in the Greek have as its cognate the same word used for “resurrection.” This would tell us that the words which Paul spoke in verse 29 had caused them to rise up from their thrones very quickly, as quickly as someone being resurrected. Then they had the meeting where they found no fault in Paul but since he appealed to Caesar, he had to be taken to Rome. The modern versions omit the phrase “and when he had thus spoken” which emphasized Paul’s desire for them to become Christians. This is what caused them consternation and wanted the examination to end because Paul took the dialogue and turned it around from him, to them. They would now have to face spiritual questions and this they feared, so when unbelievers do not wish to face any questions about salvation, they quickly truncate the conversation. The modern versions make it a casual conversation but the King James emphasizes the urgency of salvation and the expected response many believers will experience.

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