1 John 5:7

by Thomas Golda

"For there are THREE that BEAR RECORD in heaven, the Father, the Word, and the Holy Ghost: and these THREE are ONE." I John 5:7(KJV)

The 1611 KJV preserves this verse, as other Bible's do not

THREE bear record or witness in heaven....the "oneness" doctrine" is false where they say Jesus IS the Father, and vise versa.

The Trinity is 100% true. 3 "persons" bear record in heaven and these three are one....one God.

While this verse is not found in the majority of Greek manuscripts, it is found in a minority (10 total, out of about 500 that contain I John 5)

The Greek texts include 629 (fourteenth century), 61 (sixteenth century), 918 (sixteenth century), 2473 (seventeenth century), and 2318 (eighteenth century). It is also in the margins of 221 (tenth century), 635 (eleventh century), 88 (twelfth century), 429 (fourteenth century), and 636 (fifteenth century)

I John 5:7 can be traced back to the Waldensian Church to the translation of the Old Italic in the 2nd century

In the 7th century at least 12 Old Latin MSS contained the passage
In the 8th century at least 21 Old Latin MSS contained the passage
In the 9th century at least 189 Old Latin MSS contained the passage


Over 6,000 Latin manuscripts remained unexamined to this day

I John 5:7 was referred to going back to 200AD

200 AD - Tertullian quoted the verse in his Apology, Against Praxeas

250 AD - Cyprian of Carthage, wrote, "And again, of the Father, Son, and Holy Ghost IT IS WRITTEN: "And the THREE are ONE" in his On The Lapsed, On the Novatians.

Note that Cyprian is quoting and says "it is written, And the three are One." He lived from 180 to 250 A.D. and the scriptures he had at that time contained the verse in question. This is at least 100 years before anything we have today in the Greek copies. If it wasn't part of Holy Scripture, then where did he get it?

350 AD Priscillian referred to it [Corpus Scriptorum Ecclesiasticorum Latinorum, Academia Litterarum Vindobonensis, vol. xviii, p. 6.]

"and there are three which give testimony on earth, the water, the flesh the blood, and these three are in one, and there are three which give testimony in heaven, the Father, the Word, and the Spirit, and these three are one in Christ Jesus." - PRISCILLIAN (380AD)

350 AD Idacius Clarus referred to it [Patrilogiae Cursus Completus, Series Latina by Migne, vol. 62, col. 359.]

350 AD Athanasius referred to it in his De Incarnatione

380 AD Priscillian in Liber Apologeticus quotes "and there are three which give testimony in heaven, the Father, the Word, and the Spirit, and these three are one in Christ Jesus."

398 AD Aurelius Augustine used it to defend Trinitarianism in De Trinitate against the heresy of Sabellianism

415 AD Council of Carthage. The contested verse (1 John 5:7) is quoted at the Council of Carthage (415 A. D.) by Eugenius, who drew up the confession of faith for the "orthodox." It reads with the King James. How did 350 prelates in 415 A.D. take a verse to be orthodox that wasn't in the Bible? It had to exist there from the beginning. It was quoted as "Pater, VERBUM, et Spiritus Sanctus".

".....and in order that we may teach until now, more clearly than light, that the Holy Spirit is now one divinity with the Father and the Son. It is PROVED by the EVANGELIST JOHN, for HE SAYS, 'there are THREE which BEAR TESTIMONY in heaven, the FATHER, the WORD, and the HOLY SPIRIT, and THESE THREE ARE ONE" - Eugenius said at the Council of Carthage

450AD - "And there are three who give testimony in heaven, the Father, The Word, and the Spirit, and these three are one." - I John 5:7 - Anchor Bible; Epistle of John - Contra Varimadum 1.5 (CC90,20-21)- 450AD

450-530 AD. Several orthodox African writers quoted the verse when defending the doctrine of the Trinity against the gainsaying of the Vandals. These writers are:

A) Vigilius Tapensis in "Three Witnesses in Heaven"

there are three which bear testimony in heaven, the Father, the Word, and the Holy Spirit, and these three are one." - Victor Vitensis - 485AD

B) Victor Vitensis in his Historia persecutionis [Corpus Scriptorum Ecclesiasticorum Latinorum, Academia Litterarum Vindobonensis, vol. vii, p. 60.]

C) Fulgentius in "The Three Heavenly Witnesses" [Patrilogiae Cursus Completus, Series Latina by Migne, vol. 65, col. 500.]

"There are three who bear testimony in heaven, the Father, the Son and the Spirit. And the three are one being." - FULGENTIUS(527AD)

500 AD Cassiodorus cited it [Patrilogiae Cursus Completus, Series Latina by Migne, vol. 70, col. 1373.]

527 AD Fulgentius in Contra Arianos stated: "Tres sunt qui testimonium perhibent in caelo. Pater, Verbum et Spiritus, et tres unum sunt."

550 AD The "Speculum" has it [The Speculum is a treatise that contains some good Old Latin scriptures.]

636 AD Isidor of Seville quotes the verse as it stands in the KJB.

750 AD Wianburgensis referred to it

800 AD Jerome's Vulgate has it [It was not in Jerome's original Vulgate, but was brought in about 800 AD from good Old Latin manuscripts.]

157-1400 AD. Waldensian (that is, Vaudois) Bibles have the verse.

Among the list of faithful that contend for the verse:

Cyprian - 250 AD, Priscillian -385 AD, Jerome 420 AD, Fulgentius, Cassiodorus, Isidore of Seville, Jaqub of Edessa, Thomas Aquinas, John Wycliffe, Desiderus Erasmus, Lopez de Zuniga, John Calvin, Theodore Beza, Cipriano de Valera, John Owen, Francis Turretin, John Gill, Matthew Henry, Andrew Fuller, Thomas F. Middleton, Luis Gaussen, Frederick Nolan, Robert L. Dabney, Herman C. Hoskier, George Ricker Berry, Edward F. Hills, David Otis Fuller, Thomas Holland, Michael Maynard and Donald A. Waite

So, the evidence shows that I John 5:7 is the Word of God

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