1 Corinthians 11:24
 
1 Corinthians 11:24
(KJV) And when he had given thanks, he brake it, and said, Take, eat: this is my body, which is broken for you: this do in remembrance of me.
(1611 KJV) And when he had giuen thanks, he brake it, and sayd, Take, eate, this is my body, which is broken for you: this doe in remembrance of mee.
(1587 Geneva Bible) And when hee had giuen thankes, hee brake it, and sayde, Take, eate: this is my body, which is broken for you: this doe ye in remembrance of me.
(1526 Tyndale) and thanked and brake and sayde. Take ye and eate ye: this is my body which is broken for you. This do ye in the
remembraunce of me.
 
Counterfeit Versions
(CEB) After giving thanks, he broke it and said, “This is my body, which is for you; do this to remember me.”
(ERV) and gave thanks for it. Then he divided the bread and said, “This is my body; it is for you. Eat this to remember me.”
(GNB) gave thanks to God, broke it, and said, This is my body, which is for you. Do this in memory of me.
(NCV) and gave thanks for it. Then he broke the bread and said, "This is my body; it is for you. Do this to remember me."
(NLT) and gave thanks to God for it. Then he broke it in pieces and said, “This is my body, which is given for you. Do this to remember me.”
(NIV) and when he had given thanks, he broke it and said, “This is my body, which is for you; do this in remembrance of me.”
(HCSB) gave thanks, broke it, and said, "This is My body, which is for you. Do this in remembrance of Me."
(ESV) and when he had given thanks, he broke it, and said, "This is my body which is for you. Do this in remembrance of me."
(1901 ASV) and when he had given thanks, he brake it, and said, This is my body, which is for you: this do in remembrance of me.
(CEV) Then after he had given thanks, he broke it and said, "This is my body, which is given for you. Eat this and remember me."
(RSV) and when he had given thanks, he broke it, and said, "This is my body which is for you. Do this in remembrance of me."
(NRSV) and when he had given thanks, he broke it, and said, "This is my body that is for you. Do this in remembrance of me."
(NAB - Roman Catholic) and, after he had given thanks, broke it and said, "This is my body that is for you. Do this in remembrance of me."
(NWT - Jehovah’s Witnesses) and, after giving thanks, he broke it and said: “This means my body which is in YOUR behalf. Keep doing this in remembrance of me.”

Textus Receptus - Traditional Text
kai eucaristhsaV eklasen kai eipen labete jagete touto mou estin to swma to uper umwn klwmenon touto poieite eiV thn emhn anamnhsin

Hort-Westcott - Critical Text
kai eucaristhsaV eklasen kai eipen touto mou estin to swma to uper umwn touto poieite eiV thn emhn anamnhsin

Corrupted Manuscripts
This verse is corrupted in the following manuscripts:
Omit “Take, eat”
Aleph 01 - Sinaiticus - Nineteenth Century Counterfeit
A 02 - Alexandrinus - Fifth century
B 03 - Vaticanus - Fourth century
C 04 - Ephraemi Rescriptus - Fifth century (original)
D 06 - Paris: Claromontanus - Sixth century
P 46 - circa 200 AD
 
Omit “broken”
Aleph 01 - Sinaiticus - Nineteenth Century Counterfeit (original)
A 02 - Alexandrinus - Fifth century
B 03 - Vaticanus - Fourth century
C 04 - Ephraemi Rescriptus - Fifth century (original)
P 46 - circa 200 AD
 
Manuscripts which agree with the Textus Receptus for this verse
Contains “Take, eat”
Byzantine Text (450-1450 A.D.)
C 04 - Ephraemi Rescriptus - Fifth century (corrected)
K 018 - Ninth century
L 020 - Ninth century
P 025 - Ninth century
 
Contains “broken”
Byzantine Text (450-1450 A.D.)
Aleph 01 - Sinaiticus - Nineteenth Century Counterfeit (corrected)
C 04 - Ephraemi Rescriptus - Fifth century (corrected)
D 06 - Paris: Claromontanus - Sixth century (corrected)
K 018 - Ninth century
P 025 - Ninth century
 
Published Critical Greek Texts with Corruptions
Omit “Take, Eat”
Greisbach, Johann - 1805
Lachmann, Karl - 1842
Tischendorf, Constantine - 1869
Tregelles, Samuel - 1857
Alford, Henry - 1849 revised in 1871
Wordsworth, Christopher - 1856 revised in 1870
Westcott and Hort - 1881
Weiss, Bernhard - 1894
Nestle - 1927 as revised in seventeenth edition in 1941
Nestle-Aland - 1979 - Twenty Sixth Edition
Nestle-Aland - 1993 - Twenty Seventh Edition
United Bible Societies - 1983 - Fourth Edition
Von Soden, Freiherr - 1902
 
Omit “broken”
Lachmann, Karl - 1842
Tischendorf, Constantine - 1869
Tregelles, Samuel - 1857
Alford, Henry - 1849 revised in 1871
Westcott and Hort - 1881
Weiss, Bernhard - 1894
Nestle - 1927 as revised in seventeenth edition in 1941
Nestle-Aland - 1979 - Twenty Sixth Edition
Nestle-Aland - 1993 - Twenty Seventh Edition
United Bible Societies - 1983 - Fourth Edition

Affected Teaching
The Greek words for “Take” “Eat” and “Broken” are omitted in the following corrupted manuscripts: p46, Aleph, A, and B. The omission of these three vital words removes the heart out of this verse plus it attacks the sacrifice of Christ for His people. During the Last Supper, the Lord symbolically broke bread and told His disciples that this represented His body which was going to be broken for them the next day. Breaking bread is not just Christian fellowship but it celebrates the relationship that the true Christian has with the Lord Jesus Christ. That word “broken” was showing that the Lord Jesus was going to suffer much physical pain and suffering, and to remove that word was to remove the reality and severity of what was going to take place.

He also made His disciples partakers in His suffering by means of giving them the broken bread. The Bible teaches that we are so intimate with Christ that we are members of His flesh and bones.
(Eph 5:30 KJV) For we are members of his body, of his flesh, and of his bones. When Christ gave them the bread it was telling them that in order for them to become saved it was necessary for Him to suffer and just as each of them tore a piece of the bread, His body would be torn in like manner. (Luke 24:46 KJV) And said unto them, Thus it is written, and thus it behoved Christ to suffer, and to rise from the dead the third day:

For the modern versions to omit the fact that Christ’s body was going to be broken for us is to omit the crucifixion. Of course, it follows that the Gnostics of the second century would not believe that the crucifixion of Christ purchased the salvation for all the Elect, so they and their modern counterparts had to exclude this from the text.

This verse is normally read along with the rest of 1 Corinthians 11:23-34 on the day when the church celebrates Communion. We are remembering the death and resurrection of the Lord Jesus Christ and His anticipated return on the last day. In the marriage ceremony the Bible teaches that the husband‘s body belongs to the wife and the wife’s body belongs to the husband.
(1 Cor 7:4 KJV) The wife hath not power of her own body, but the husband: and likewise also the husband hath not power of his own body, but the wife. They are given to each other wholly but the Lord Jesus Christ, in taking His bride, was required to have His body broken according to the Scriptures. So when the word “broken” is omitted, it omits a great spiritual lesson and lessens the sacrifice of Christ. When the words “Take, Eat” are left out, they remove the intimacy that the believer has with the Lord Jesus Christ. (1 Cor 10:17 KJV) For we being many are one bread, and one body: for we are all partakers of that one bread.

So the next time your Pastor uses a modern version at Communion, you will see the emptiness of those words versus the reality of what took place. You can give your body to someone without suffering. You can give it to them in service or a husband or wife can give it to each other in pleasure but the word “broken” brings a special meaning to a special relationship between Christ and His church. If Christ’s body was not broken, then we are still in our sins.

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